Shop Talk Blog

The Official Blog for Texas Final Drive

Results of Hydraulic Contamination

Hydraulic contamination is a serious problem for final drive motors, and even more so for newer models that have tighter clearances. In this Shop Talk Blog post, we are going to discuss some of the results of hydraulic contamination and how to prevent them. It's easier than you may think!

 


Here are a few other Shop Talk Blog posts you might enjoy:

Compact Excavators and the Zombie Apocalypse

If you’re thinking ahead, you probably know that you need to be prepared for the zombie apocalypse. If you plan to build shelters and clean up zombie bodies, then you need to make sure your compact excavator is ready for the first outbreak and beyond.

 

Here are a few other Shop Talk Blog posts you might find of interest ...

 

Advancements in Hydraulic Motor Design: Clearances

The most modern hydraulic motor designs include clearances that are much smaller than those of older models. These smaller clearances, while providing even better efficiency and performance, can cause their own share of problems. That’s the topic of this Shop Talk Blog -- as well as how to deal with the problems that result from reduced clearances.

Here are some additional posts you may be interested in ...

Worst Final Drive Motor Fails: Radial Piston Hydraulic Motor

In our continuing discussion on some of the worst final drive motors fails we’ve seen here at Texas Final Drive, allow us to present a very badly scarred radial piston hydraulic motor. This final drive was totaled -- there is just no coming back from this kind of damage.


Here are a few other blog posts you might enjoy!

When To Change Your Hydraulic Fluid

In past blog posts, we’ve talked about when to flush your hydraulic system. As you probably know, there is a major difference between flushing a hydraulic system (which involves a great deal of time, quite a bit of hydraulic fluid, and multiple filter changes) and merely changing out the fluid. Still, it seems, there is some confusion about when to change out your hydraulic fluid, and manufacturer guidelines can be a bit misleading.


Here are a few other blog posts you might find useful ...

The Basics of Cavitation

The effects of cavitation are usually pretty easy to identify -- it causes a metal surface to have a pitted, crater-like appearance. What happens when cavitation takes place, and how it actually causes damage to normally resistant metals, isn’t quite as well known. In this Shop Talk Blog post, we’ll be talking about what causes cavitation and why it can result in so much damage.


Here are a few other posts from our Shop Talk Blog series ...

Maintaining Hydraulic Motors on Drilling Equipment

When you’re out in the field running drilling equipment, you can’t afford to have your hydraulic system break down. The best way to prevent a breakdown is preventative maintenance, and that includes your final drive motors, too. In this Shop Talk Blog post, we are going to talk about maintaining the hydraulic propel motors on your drilling equipment.


Here are a few other blog posts that might be of interest ...

Hydraulic Motor Cam Ring Wear

Here at Texas Final Drive, we work quite a bit with radial piston hydraulic motors and Geroler motors. These motors, like anything else mechanical, will eventually wear out. The most damaging wear affects the cam ring, and that’s the topic for this Shop Talk Blog post.

 

Here are a few other Shop Talk Blog posts you might find helpful ...

Abrasive Contamination and Final Drive Motors

by Dr McCaslin | Oct 23, 2018 |

Hydraulic Contamination

|
0 Comments

We see quite a few final drive hydraulic motors that have been severely damaged by abrasive contamination on the hydraulic side. In this Shop Talk Blog post, we discuss what abrasive contamination is, where it comes from, what it does to your final drive, and how it can be minimized.


Here are a few more blog posts you might be interested in reading ...

Preventing Hydraulic Contamination

Your final drive is just one of many components that make up the hydraulic system on your machine. All those components share the same hydraulic fluid. If contamination enters at one point in the system, you run the risk of it causing damage to other parts of the system. That’s why it is so critical to you do your best to prevent hydraulic contamination. In an ideal world, you would only open up the hydraulic system in a clean environment -- but we realize that isn’t always realistic. Here are some practical hints and tips to help you prevent hydraulic contamination.


Here are some other blog posts on similar subjects ...

"Shop Talk Blog" Email Updates

Connect blog-rss-feed 

Posts by Topic

see all